Last edited by Mikagor
Wednesday, October 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of Ultrastructure of animal viruses and bacteriophages found in the catalog.

Ultrastructure of animal viruses and bacteriophages

Albert J. Dalton

Ultrastructure of animal viruses and bacteriophages

an atlas

by Albert J. Dalton

  • 65 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Academic Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Viruses -- Atlases,
  • Bacteriophages -- Atlases

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Albert J. Dalton and Françoise Haguenau.
    GenreAtlases
    SeriesUltrastructure in biological systems
    ContributionsHaguenau, Françoise.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 413 p.
    Number of Pages413
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23745769M

    • Viruses have an inner core of nucleic acid surrounded by protein coat known as an envelope • Most viruses range in sizes from 20 – nm • Animal or insect vectors – Rabies virus •Targeting of the virus to specific tissue and cell types •Receptor Recognition. Bacteriophage (also known as phages) are viruses that target and infect only bacterial cells. The first observation of what turned out to be bacteriophage was made in Almost twenty years later, the British bacteriologist Frederick Twort ( – ) demonstrated that an unknown microorganism that could pass through a filter that.

      The study of viruses, or virology as it is now called, had its origin in when a Russian botanist, Iwanawsky, showed that sap from a tobacco plant with an infectious disease was still highly infectious after passage through a filter Pages: The structural characteristics of the RNA oncogenic viruses have been compared and illustra 14 and the A, B, and C type viruses of mouse, cat, monkey, and human cells compared. 12 Haguenau 15 has illustrated and discussed the most commonly encountered cellular organelles and structural formations which resemble virus particles and are Cited by: 1.

    Viruses - From Structure to Biology. Sondra and Milton Schlesinger (Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO). Did DNA Come From Viruses? Article by Carl Zimmer about Patrick Forterre's work. Virus Ultrastructure. Linda Stannard, University of Cape Town. Electron Micrographs of Animal Viruses. The chapter introduces concepts of viral biology on the example of prokaryotic viruses and highlights key differences between them, animal, and plant viruses. Examples of limited number of classical viral systems (T4, T7, herpes simplex virus type 1, HIV, influenza, tobacco mosaic virus) are used to illustrate science principles underlying the.


Share this book
You might also like
Porfirio Diaz

Porfirio Diaz

Register of current Community legal instruments.

Register of current Community legal instruments.

Human resources & payroll systems requirements

Human resources & payroll systems requirements

Salary, Chief Clerk Navy-Yard, Washington

Salary, Chief Clerk Navy-Yard, Washington

Frankenstein

Frankenstein

Ireland; its health-resorts and watering places.

Ireland; its health-resorts and watering places.

Fear of love

Fear of love

Managing for the future

Managing for the future

Advances in participatory forest management in South Asia

Advances in participatory forest management in South Asia

Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger

Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger

Communications in the Rural Third World

Communications in the Rural Third World

Unemployment equilibria and imput prices

Unemployment equilibria and imput prices

Mexico oil report

Mexico oil report

Project Box:.

Project Box:.

Respiration and excretion (The human body series)

Respiration and excretion (The human body series)

Oregon forest cluster analysis

Oregon forest cluster analysis

English heritage monitor

English heritage monitor

all sorts readers

all sorts readers

The comical sayings of Paddy from Cork, with his coat buttoned behind, to keep his belly warm.

The comical sayings of Paddy from Cork, with his coat buttoned behind, to keep his belly warm.

Ultrastructure of animal viruses and bacteriophages by Albert J. Dalton Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: Atlas Atlases, Pictorial Atlases Scientific atlases: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Dalton, Albert J. (Albert Joseph), Ultrastructure of animal viruses and bacteriophages.

Ultrastructure of Animal Viruses and Bacteriophages [Dalton, A.J. and Haguenau, F. (ed)] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ultrastructure of Animal Viruses and Author: F. (ed) Dalton, A.J. and Haguenau. Ultrastructure of Animal Viruses and Bacteriophages: An Atlas (Ultrastructure of Biological Systems, Vol.

5) [Dalton, Albert Joseph, Haguenau, Francoise] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ultrastructure of Animal Viruses and Bacteriophages: An Atlas (Ultrastructure of Biological Systems, Vol. 5)Author: Albert Joseph Dalton. Mter the discoveryof the tobacco mosaic virus by D.

Ivanov­ skU in [14], the new science of virology was born and began to develop rapidly. The number of viruses now known is enormous and they can infect nearly all animal and plant organisms. Microorganisms themselves are no exception to this rule. Ultrastructure of Animal Viruses and Bacteriophages: An Atlas (Ultrastructure of Biological Systems, Vol.

5) Published by Academic Press, Inc. () ISBN ISBN Bacteriophage are viruses of bacteria and arguably are the most numerous "organisms" on history of phage study is captured, in part, in the books published on the topic. This is a list of over monographs on or related to phages.

Some viruses that infect archaea have complex structures unrelated to any other form of virus. These include a wide variety of unusual shapes, ranging from spindle-shaped structures, to viruses that resemble hooked rods, teardrops, or even bottles.

Other archaeal viruses resemble the tailed bacteriophages, and can have multiple tail structures. xix, pages: 28 cm. Access-restricted-item true Addeddate Associated-names Maramorosch, Karl; Dalton, Albert J. (Albert Joseph), Ultrastructure of animal viruses and bacteriophagesPages: A bacteriophage (/ b æ k ˈ t ɪər i oʊ f eɪ dʒ /), also known informally as a phage (/ f eɪ dʒ /), is a virus that infects and replicates within bacteria and term was derived from "bacteria" and the Greek φαγεῖν (phagein), meaning "to devour".Bacteriophages are composed of proteins that encapsulate a DNA or RNA genome, and may have structures that are either simple.

Animal viruses, such as HIV, are frequently enveloped. Head and tail viruses infect bacteria and have a head that is similar to icosahedral viruses and a tail shape like filamentous viruses.

Many viruses use some sort of glycoprotein to attach to their host cells via molecules on the cell called viral receptors (Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\)). Viruses12, AMA Style Mohamed A, Taha O, El-Sherif HM, Connerton PL, Hooton SP, Bassim ND, Connerton IF, El-Shibiny A.

Bacteriophage ZCSE2 is a Potent Antimicrobial against Salmonella enterica Serovars: Ultrastructure, Genomics and Efficacy. Formation of tumors. Interactions among plant viruses. Plant responses to virus infection. Bacteriophages and their host. Viruses as tools in medicine and biotechnology. Diagnostic use of immune response.

Viral vaccines. Other antiviral approaches. Animal viruses and biotechnology. Plant viruses and biotechnology. Bacteriophages and biotechnology. Viruses can be spread by direct transfer of sap by contact of a wounded plant with a healthy one.

Such contact may occur during agricultural practices, as by damage caused by tools or hands, or naturally, as by an animal feeding on the plant.

Generally TMV, potato viruses and cucumber mosaic viruses are transmitted via sap. Mter the discoveryof the tobacco mosaic virus by D. Ivanov­ skU in [14], the new science of virology was born and began to develop rapidly.

The number of viruses now known is enormous and they can infect nearly all animal and plant organisms. Developing novel antimicrobials capable of controlling multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens is essential to restrict the use of antibiotics.

Bacteriophages (phages) constitute a major resource that can be harnessed as an alternative to traditional antimicrobial therapies. Phage ZCSE2 was isolated among several others from raw sewage but was distinguished by broad-spectrum.

The viruses that infect human beings are currently grouped into 21 families, which are only a small spectrum of different viruses whose host ranges extend from vertebrates to. Description: xix, p.: ill. Language: English ISBN:LCCN: MeSH: Insect Viruses/ultrastructure*; Plant Viruses/ultrastructure* Publication Type(s): Atlases Notes: Companion volume to Ultrastructure of animal viruses and bacteriophages: an atlas.

NLM ID: [Book]. Virus electron microscopy (EM) peaked in with the publication of classic atlases of animal, bacterial, and plant viruses [6,7,8] and a book on phage ultrastructure. Today, thousands of viruses have been examined in the electron microscope, including at least viruses of bacteria and by: publication of classic atlases of animal, bacterial, and plant viruses [6–8] and a book on phage ultrastructure [9].

Today, thousands of viruses ha ve been examined in the electron microscope. most viruses of animals and plants are either rod-shaped or spherical. InRuska [] showed for the first time that the viruses of bacteria, or bacteriophages, as a rule, are particles of characteristic shape resembling spermatozoa.

The relatively. An interesting feature of viral complexity is that host and virion complexity are uncorrelated. Some of the most intricate virion structures are observed in bacteriophages, viruses that infect the simplest living organisms: bacteria.

Morphology. Viruses come in many shapes and sizes, but these are consistent and distinct for each viral family.Virus - Virus - Size and shape: The amount and arrangement of the proteins and nucleic acid of viruses determine their size and shape.

The nucleic acid and proteins of each class of viruses assemble themselves into a structure called a nucleoprotein, or nucleocapsid.

Some viruses have more than one layer of protein surrounding the nucleic acid; still others have a lipoprotein .February 7, –Aug BY ROBERT P. PERRY. THOMAS F.(“TOM”) ANDERSON was internationally known for his pioneering use of the electron microscope to study viruses and bacteria.

His ability to master the instrument in its early stages of development, his invention of an ingenious method for specimen preservation, and his acute perspicacity in interpreting his .